Lesson 18

In the 18th lesson we are going to learn the last three harfs, three stong harfs above which the short vocal “E” ie. (fatha) is read like “A“. When they come with a sukoon with fatha in front of it, the fatha is read like “A”. They are joined from both sides and the first is:
The harf “HAA” doesn’t exist in our language and it is the third form of the letter “H”. It looks like the harfs “JEEM” and “HAA” but this harf doesn’t have a dot under or above. We call it sharp “H”.  During the pronunciation of this harf the pharynx channel is narrowed. The air coming from the lungs comes to a tight blockage and a sharp sound is created. The tongue must be stiff and pulled back during the pronunciation. The pronunciation of this harf is similar to our “H”, but the only difference is that the throat is tightened.
The harf “EIN” also doesn’t exist in our language and it is one of the hardest harfs for pronunciation. During the pronunciation of this harf the root and back part of the tongue are pulled back. After the air from the lungs is released and the blockage in the pharynx channel opens, the tongue has to be moved forward quickly and the lip muscles are tightened. The pronunciation of this sound is equal to the pronunciation of the sound „A“ to the half. It is pronounced with the mouth open so that the air flows out through a tightened throat.
The harf “GHEIN” looks smilar to the harf “EIN” but it has a dot above. During the pronunciation of this harf the back part of the tongue must move towards the soft palate. When the air from the lungs comes we can hear a rasping, vibrant noise similar to the sound made by a pigeon or a baby. The pronunciation of this harf is somewhat similar to our letter “G” and it is pronounced with a strong croaking voice. When it has a sukoon we have to pay attention not to overpronounce it.

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