Lesson 16

The sixteenth lesson introduces three new harfs, the first three out of nine harfs where the „fatha“ is read like short „A“ when it is placed above them. These harfs can be joined from both sides. The first of these three is the harf “QAAF” which looks like the harf “FAA” with the difference that it has two dots above and it doesn’t exist in our language. When this harf is pronounced, the tongue moves backward, and its rear part lifts up towards the soft palates near the uvula. The air coming from the lungs breaks the formed obstacle, and the tongue quickly goes down. When this happens we hear an explosive sound. When it comes with a sukoon it is intensified. We call this harf a hard „Q“.
The harf “SAAD” doesn’t exist in our language, and we can say that it is the third form of the letter “S” or hard “S”. When this harf is pronounced the front part of the tongue leans toward the edge of the lower incisor teeth, the rear part of the tongue lifts up towards the soft palate, and the central part of the tongue is concave. The lips are moderately bulged and rounded, and the lip muscles are loosened up. The pronunciation is quite similar to the letter S with the difference that the harf „SAAD“ is pronounced more intensely.
The harf “DAAD” also doesn’t exist in our language, and can be described as hard „D“. When we pronounce this harf, the tip of the tongue presses the root of the upper incisor teeth, the rear part of the tongue lifts up towards the soft palate, the lips are moderatley rounded and the mouth opened a bit more. During the pronunciation we hear an explosive souind.